Jun
14
8:45 AM08:45

Post-party Politics, Forum Shopping and Liberia’s 2017 Elections

Co-presenter: ‘Post-party Politics, Forum Shopping and Liberia’s 2017 Elections’, 2019 European Conference on African Studies (ECAS): Africa: Connections and Disruptions, Pol 14 on ‘Regime Change, Democratic Experiments and Trends in Succession Politics in Africa’ (June 14, 2019), Edinburgh, Scotland.

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De-centring the "White Gaze" of Development
Jun
20
11:00 AM11:00

De-centring the "White Gaze" of Development

Keynote Speaker: ‘De-centring the “White Gaze” of Development’, Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Opening up Development (June 20, 2019), Milton Keynes, UK.

ABSTRACT

In its crudest form, ‘development’ has traditionally been about dissecting the political, socio-economic, and cultural processes of black, brown, and other non-white subjects in the so-called Global South and finding them ‘regressive’, particularly in comparison to the so-called ‘progressive’ Global North. However, in the midst of a twenty-first century, ‘de-colonial’ scholarly pivot, opening up development fundamentally demands turning the colonial, ‘white gaze’ on its head. In particular, contemporary social media movements challenging white supremacy such as #BlackLivesMatter have gained prominence while non-white development actors such as China have emerged as enticing alternatives. These phenomena have pried open development with both positive and negative results, intended and unintended consequences. My keynote seeks to put Critical Development Studies in fluid conversation with Critical Race Studies in an examination of how scholars, policymakers and practitioners have simultaneously succeeded and failed in subverting the ‘white gaze’ of development.

https://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/news/robtel-neajai-pailey-give-keynote-development-studies-association-conference

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Jaadeh!: A Lesson in Honesty
Jul
6
3:00 PM15:00

Jaadeh!: A Lesson in Honesty

Facilitator: ‘A Lesson in Honesty - Jaadeh!’, Africa Writes Literary Festival Family Workshop (July 6, 2019), London, UK.


Location: Harry M. Weinrebe Learning Centre at The British Library
Free/Drop in/For ages 6 - 11

Gather round in a circle and join us for a journey to Liberia, a country in West Africa, and learn new words in Bassa. Robtel Neajai Pailey, author of Jaadeh!, invites families to explore what it means to be accountable to self, community, nation and globe.

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Gbagba and Jaadeh! as Transparency Revolutions from 'Below'
Apr
28
7:30 PM19:30

Gbagba and Jaadeh! as Transparency Revolutions from 'Below'

  • Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre (ROLACC) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Speaker:Gbagba and Jaadeh! as Transparency Revolutions from ‘Below’.’ Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre (ROLACC) LLM Open Evening and International Anti-Corruption Masterclass 2019, Achieving Transparency – Issues in the Modern World (April 28, 2019), Doha, Qatar.

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Apr
25
1:30 PM13:30

After Data Is Collected: Collaboration in Analysis, Writing, and Impact Activities

Panellist: ‘After Data Is Collected: Collaboration in Analysis, Writing, and Impact Activities’, Towards More Equitable Interdisciplinary Research Partnerships, Development Studies Association/Economic and Social Research Council Interdisciplinary Workshop Series (April 25, 2019), London, UK.

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Gbagba and Jaadeh! as Anti-Corruption 'Revolutions from Below'
Dec
10
2:00 PM14:00

Gbagba and Jaadeh! as Anti-Corruption 'Revolutions from Below'

  • Malaysian Institute of Integrity (Integriti) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Presenter: Gbagba and Jaadeh! as ‘Revolutions from Below’’, Malaysian Institute of Integrity (Integriti) Seminar on Anti-Corruption Champions: Sharing Session with the Winners of the 2018 International Anti-Corruption Excellence Awards (December 10, 2018), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Building Collective Consciousness for the Fight against Corruption
Nov
29
2:30 PM14:30

Building Collective Consciousness for the Fight against Corruption

  • Gaborone International Convention Centre (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Discussant: ‘Building Collective Consciousness for the Fight against Corruption’, African Union (AU) and African Governance Architecture (AGA) sponsored 2018 High Level Dialogue on Democracy, Human Rights and Governance in Africa: Trends, Challenges, Prospects, Session Three (November 29, 2018), Gaborone, Botswana.

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Experiences of Shifting Social Norms around Corruption: Gbagba and Jaadeh! as ‘Revolutions from Below’
Nov
13
9:00 AM09:00

Experiences of Shifting Social Norms around Corruption: Gbagba and Jaadeh! as ‘Revolutions from Below’

  • Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Guest Speaker: ‘Experiences of Shifting Social Norms around Corruption: Gbagba and Jaadeh! as ‘Revolutions from Below’, U4 Anti-corruption Resource Centre Annual Seminar on ‘Social Norms and Anti-corruption’ (November 13, 2018), Copenhagen, Denmark.

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Nov
1
12:00 PM12:00

Post-party Politics? Local, National and Transnational Dimensions of Liberia’s 2017 Elections

  • Institute for African Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Presenter: ‘Post-party Politics? Local, National and Transnational Dimensions of Liberia’s 2017 Elections’, Institute for African Studies/Russian Academy of Sciences Elections in Africa Internal Changes and Foreign Policy of African Countries Conference Series, Panel 2 on ‘Elections in Africa: National and International Aspects’ (November 1, 2018), Moscow, Russia.

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Sep
21
2:40 PM14:40

Decolonisation and Social Media

Panellist: ‘Decolonisation and Social Media’ Roundtable, Nordic Africa Days 2018, African Mobilities (September 21, 2018), Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT: Global academia, and African Studies in particular, is in the midst of a new wave of debates and interventions calling for the decolonisation of academic disciplines, school curricula and university structures. The South African “Rhodes Must Fall” movement was not only one of the trailblazers in this most recent mobilisation against the persistent inequalities and prejudice in African and Africanist higher education, it also demonstrated the power and potential of social media as a platform for social and political mobilisation. This Roundtable considers the escalating calls for the decolonisation of African(ist) academia with particular attention to the roles and potential of social media.

Chair: Patience Mususa

Panellists: Francis Nyamnjoh, Henning Melber, Robtel Neajai Pailey

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Sep
12
9:00 AM09:00

Post-party Politics? Local, National and Transnational Dimensions of Liberia's 2017 Elections

Co-presenter: 'Post-party Politics? Local, National and Transnational Dimensions of Liberia's 2017 Elections’, African Studies Association of the United Kingdom (ASAUK) 2018 Conference, Session OS9 on ‘State-making from Below' (September 12, 2018), Birmingham, UK.

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Sep
6
2:30 PM14:30

Representing Migration: Diversifying Voices and Audiences

Moderator: ‘Representing Migration: Diversifying Voices and Audiences', Theme 7, UNESCO Regional Office for Southern Africa and the University of Wits’ African Centre for Migration and Society ‘International Conference on Migration: Southern Perspectives on Migration: Addressing Knowledge Production, Policies and Cooperation’, (September 6, 2018), Johannesburg, South Africa.

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Sep
6
8:30 AM08:30

Return, Reintegration and Remigration of African Migrants in ‘Post-Crisis’ Contexts: Lessons for Policy and Practice

Speaker: ‘Return, Reintegration and Remigration of African Migrants in ‘Post-Crisis’ Contexts: Lessons for Policy and Practice’, UNESCO Regional Office for Southern Africa and the University of Wits’ African Centre for Migration and Society ‘International Conference on Migration: Southern Perspectives on Migration: Addressing Knowledge Production, Policies and Cooperation’, Theme 6 on ‘Mobility and Social Transformation’ (September 6, 2018), Johannesburg, South Africa.

ABSTRACT: Crisis, defined for the purpose of this paper as armed conflict, impacts African migrants differently depending on a wide range of factors such as the economic stability and geo-political positioning of the origin or host country, the high-profile (or low-profile) nature of the crisis and resulting external responses, the socio-economic status of migrants, their relationships with non-migrant populations and with the origin or host state, as well as migrants’ “preparedness” and “resource mobilisation” (Cassarino, 2004). African migrants may respond to crises by staying put, returning to their countries of origin or re-migrating elsewhere depending on the opportunity structures available.

Situating ‘post-crisis’ return as part and parcel of the crisis cycle, this paper argues that socio-economic embeddedness in countries of origin is a necessary, though not sufficient, condition for sustainable and successful return of African migrants impacted by crisis in destination countries. It argues that transnational linkages, national, regional, and multilateral policies and practices play a role in facilitating return and reintegration as well as encouraging remigration to countries affected by crises or elsewhere. Lessons are drawn from empirical data collected for the European Union-funded Migrants in Countries in Crisis research component examining crises in Côte d’Ivoire, Libya, and Central African Republic, amongst other case studies.

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Jun
25
2:30 PM14:30

Libya Post-2011: The Consequences of Foreign Military Intervention in a Migration Hub

  • International Centre for Migration Policy Development, Libya Project (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Presenter: 'Libya Post-2011: The Consequences of Foreign Military Intervention in a Migration Hub', International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) Libya Project, Academia Conference on Promoting Knowledge for Evidence-Based Sustainable Migration Governance in Libya: The Mediterranean Perspective, 1st Discussion Session on 'The Geo-political Context of Migration in Libya and in Its Neighbourhoods' (June 25, 2018), Tunis, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT:   Long before NATO’s military intervention in 2011 leading to the ouster of Muammar Gaddafi, Libya served as a major destination for intra-Africa migration.  In the 1990s, it became a centre of revolutionary zeal and economic growth for sub-Saharan migrants, primarily due to its growing isolation from the West following the Lockerbie bombing over Scotland in 1988. On the one hand, Libya hosted and trained migrant mercenaries from countries such as Burkina Faso, Liberia and Sierra Leone in West Africa, thereby fuelling political crises in these locales and creating spillover migration effects regionally. On the other hand, Libya served as a pole of prosperity for labour migrants from Central African countries such as Chad, thereby creating remittance channels to stem household poverty in these locales. Gadaffi’s pro-Africa political stances (manifested in African guest worker programmes, visa exemptions for African nationals, etc), transformed Libya into a pan-Africanist haven. Desperate to realign with Europe in exchange for sanctions withdrawal in the early 2000s, however, Libya collaborated with Western countries in joint-border control measures to restrict the movement of Africans by subjecting them to harassment, physical assault, and arbitrary detention. This, coupled with post-2011 revolution violence and instability, has fuelled the so-called ‘migration crisis’ across the Mediterranean. 

This presentation will highlight how external military interventions in the internal political affairs of migration hubs such as Libya can create negative unintended consequences for domestic citizens, migrants and their families, regional neighbours, and international actors spearheading intervention efforts. It demonstrates how military interventions in countries of destination can ultimately reap disastrous results, especially if non-regional actors disregard the advice of regional institutions such as the African Union, which advocated for a more political solution to the domestic Libyan crisis. The presentation draws lessons from empirical data collected for the European Union-funded Migrants in Countries in Crisis (MICIC) research component examining crises in Libya, Côte d’Ivoire, and Central African Republic, amongst other case studies.

External Link: https://www.icmpd.org/news-centre/events/calendar-detail/?no_cache=1&tx_calender_pi2%5Bentry%5D=1264

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